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2018 Diabetes Canada Guidelines - Medications for Type 2 Diabetes

>> Monday, April 16, 2018



It can seem daunting to consider that in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, there are now 9 classes of medications available that lower blood sugars (and several different medications within each of these classes).  Which medications to choose, and in which order, are driven by data surrounding efficacy, safety, and ability to prevent cardiovascular events (one of the major diabetes complications we are aiming to prevent).  Over the last few years, we have seen several diabetes medications emerge that reduce the risk of cardiovascular events, and with this information, we are seeing more of an algorithm emerge that guides clinicians on which order to consider these different medications.

The 2018 Diabetes Canada Clinical Practice Guidelines Pharmacotherapy chapter now provides an algorithm that not only takes into account cardiovascular risk protection, but also prioritizes the diabetes medications that do not cause two unwanted side effects that are cause by some types of diabetes medications: weight gain, and low blood sugars (hypoglycemia).

This chapter is excellent, comprehensive, (necessarily) big and the list of key messages is long - I encourage patients to read the Key Messages for People With Diabetes, and clinicians to read the entire chapter, but here are some of the highlights:

1.  In people with type 2 diabetes with A1C less than 1.5% above the individual patient's target, glucose lowering medication should be added if targets are not reached with healthy lifestyle interventions within 3 months.

2.  In people with type 2 diabetes with A1C 1.5% or more above the patient's target, medication should be initiated concomitantly with healthy behavior interventions, and consideration could be given to initiating combination therapy with 2 medications.

(note that the old guidelines used an A1C of 8.5% as the cutoffs above. The new wording reflects that the A1C target, though usually 7% or less,  can be different from one person to the next - more on this here.)


3. Insulin should be started immediately if there is syptomatic hyperglycemia or metabolic decompensation.  In the absence of metabolic decompensation, metformin is still the first choice of medication in people with new type 2 diabetes.

4.  Target diabetes control should be achieved within 3-6 months.


5.  In people with cardiovascular disease in whom A1C targets are not achieved, a medication with cardiovascular benefit should be added to existing therapy: empagliflozin, liraglutide; or canagliflozin (with a lower grade and level of evidence for canagliflozin).

6.   In people without cardiovascular disease who are not at glycemic targets, DPP4 inhibitors, GLP1 receptor agonists, and/or SGLT2 inhibitors should be considered as add on medication over sulfonylureas, meglitinides, insulin and thiazolidinedones, if lower risk of hypoglycemia and/or weight gain are priorities. (Grade A, Level 1A evidence)

7.  In people who are on insulin who are not at blood sugar targets, adding a GLP1 receptor agonist, DPP4 inhibitor, or SGLT2 inhibitor may be considered before adding or intensifying mealtime insulin therapy, with less weight gain and comparable or lower hypoglycaemia risk.


8.  Newer basal insulins (degludec and U-300 glargine) may be considered over U-100 glargine to reduce overall and overnight hypoglycaemia.


This chapter now includes an excellent table (see table 1 here) that lists the effect of diabetes medications on A1C, weight, cardiovascular outcomes, and other therapeutic considerations as well.




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www.drsue.ca © 2018



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2018 Diabetes Canada Guidelines Are Out!

>> Monday, April 9, 2018



The Diabetes Canada (formerly Canadian Diabetes Association) Guidelines are issued in full every 5 years.   As a coauthor of the Weight Management Chapter, I can tell you that these Guidelines have truly been a labor of love for all of us - more than two years with several rounds of evidence review, drafting, re-drafting as new data comes out.... and this is what makes our guidelines one of the most respected diabetes documents in the world!

The 2018 Guidelines are exciting, with a number of substantial changes from the 2013 edition in terms of approach, rigour of methodology, and recommendations.

Each chapter in the Guidelines is structured with a framework including:

Key Messages

Key Messages For People With Diabetes (this is new and awesome, and reflects that the Guidelines are intended not only for the use of health care providers, but also for people with diabetes)

Recommendations


Over the next weeks, I will be posting blogs highlighting some of the key points and changes to the guidelines, and I'll always include a link to the chapter itself if you'd like to read it in full.

Enjoy!

Follow me on twitter! @drsuepedersen

www.drsue.ca © 2018




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A HEARTFELT WELCOME!

I am excited that you have arrived at my site, and I hope you are too - consider this the first step towards a Healthier New You!! As a medical doctor, Endocrinologist, and obesity specialist, I am absolutely passionate about helping people with weight management. Though there is certainly no magic cure for obesity, there IS a successful treatment plan out there for you - it is all about understanding the elements that contribute to your personal weight struggle, and then finding the treatment plan that suits your needs and your lifestyle. The way to finding your personal solution is to learn as much as you can about obesity: how our toxic environment has shaped us into an overweight society; the diversity of contributors to obesity; and what the treatment options out there are really all about. Knowledge Is Power!!


Are you ready to change your life? Let's begin our journey together, towards a healthier, happier you!!




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